Browsing Tag

inspiration

Colours of Baltics

travelling-baltics

I have an obsession. No, I’m not talking about chocolate (although I am indeed quite passionate about it, too);  I’m talking about photographing buildings. Last year on our trip to Italy I spent a good amount of time taking pictures of charming rainbow-coloured houses. So, when we travelled through Baltics this year, I again found myself pointing the lens of my camera up towards different kinds of buildings.

Here’s a glimpse of the colours of Riga and Vilnius. Both the cities were definitely worth of visiting – they are affordable, full of history and yet to be discovered by the biggest masses of tourists. Especially Riga stole my heart with the many parks, second-hand shops, cafes, market halls and museums.

Travelling-Baltics Travelling-Baltics Travelling-Baltics Travelling-BalticsTravelling-Baltics Travelling-Baltics

Favourite children’s books: Astronautin rusinapulla

Ladies and gentlemen, let me present you the third book in my archive of inspiring children’s books: a rhyming Finnish poetry book (which unfortunately hasn’t been translated to English) written by one of my favourite children’s book authors, Jukka Itkonen.


Astronautin rusinapulla
Loosely translated: Astronaut’s Raisin Bun
Written by Jukka Itkonen, illustrated by Matti Pikkujämsä

Badge of greatness for playful rhymes and matching visuals


astronautin-rusinapulla-lasten-lorukirjaI love, love, love rhymes, and when I first came across the children’s books of Jukka Itkonen, it was literally literary love at first page. The prolific Finnish writer has written multiple rhyming poetry books for children under different themes, and now I will present you one of them: Astronaut’s Raisin Bun. The theme of this collection of poems is food: where it comes from, who makes it and how it is eaten. The poems introduce a number of different characters and their food-related stories. There’s a picky eater, a real culinarista, a secret agent and a pizza baker, just to mention a few. The characters are exhilaratingly recognisable and the choice of words in the poems are sure to give the reader – young or old – the giggles.

astronautin-rusinapulla-lasten-lorukirjaInstead of focusing on fantasies (although Astronaut’s Raisin Bun does feature a superman), the books of Itkonen tend to give a witty spin to perfectly normal things, portraying them from a humorous point of view. As you might remember from the previous book feature, I’m a huge fan of writers who have this kind of realistic yet amusing approach to their stories. 

astronautin-rusinapulla-lasten-lorukirjaWhen it comes to illustrations, Astronaut’s Raisin Bun is not the only book that Jukka Itkonen and the illustrator Matti Pikkujämsä have collaborated on. And if you ask me, that’s no wonder – the raw brush strokes of Pikkujämsä go really well with the uncomplicated, humorous text. Also the typographic choice of hand-written titles combined with a typewriter font compliments the style of the book well. All in all, I think the written and visual elements of the book compliment each other beautifully, making a great, coherent package.

astronautin-rusinapulla-lasten-lorukirjaastronautin-rusinapulla-lasten-lorukirjaMy favourite poem in the book is about a grandma, who reminisces her childhood in a pizzeria. It was so wonderfully fun that I had to make my own grandma read it, too! To give you a taste of the poems in the book, here’s a snippet of it (in Finnish):

Isoäiti pizzeriassa

Muistot tulvii mieleeni,
ja kerron vähän tästä
minun lapsuudestani
ja maalaiselämästä.

Ennen vanhaan eläminen
oli erilaista.
Ei meille ruokaa lennätetty
kaukaisista maista.

Kirnupiimää hörpittiin
ja syötiin piirakoita.
Ja kun kermaa kirnuttiin
niin siitä tuli voita.

Vanhat ajat, niistä kyllä
riittäis kertomista.
Tarjoilija, olkaa hyvä,
tuokaa pizzalista.

Oh boy. Did I already mention how much I love rhyming poems…?

Colours of Italy

Riviera_colours_by_Emmi_Ojala

A few weeks ago, I packed my backpack and travelled to Italian Riviera. The week I spent there (marinating myself in SPF 50 sunscreen) was wonderful. We travelled from one town to another and changed the scenery pretty much everyday, ate great pizza, amazing gelato and found the best pasta bolognese in a simple beach bar in San Remo. We walked till our feet were about to fall off, swam in the most extraordinary places between the cliffs and also got to experience an impressive thunderstorm on the hills.

I carried my camera everywhere we went and it became a bit of a thing for me to photograph the charmingly colourful old buildings. Some of them also had painted decorations on them, making it difficult to see whether the intricate frames around the windows were real or 2D paintings. Indeed, the Italians seemed to have paid lots of attention to details and the colour palette of their towns. 

Visiting the colourful villages, I couldn’t help thinking what a pity it is that the majority of Northern European cities are quite plain and colourless. It reminded me of something that happened years ago in Finland, when my parents decided to be a bit playful and had the wall of our back porch painted purple. The innocent splash of colour resulted in a disapproving comment from the officials. Luckily, the porch was facing the forest, so there was practically no-one except the squirrels to see it. Therefore, we didn’t end up having to repaint it. Of course, the case would have been different had there been another house facing our back yard, allowing our neighbours to see the purple porch. Good grief, the poor people might even have found it cheerful!

Anyway, back to Italy. Here’s a glimpse of the Italian colour palette:

Riviera_colours_by_Emmi_Ojala Riviera_colours_by_Emmi_Ojala Riviera_colours_by_Emmi_OjalaRiviera_colours_by_Emmi_Ojala Riviera_colours_by_Emmi_Ojala Riviera_colours_by_Emmi_Ojala Riviera_colours_by_Emmi_Ojala Were you able to spot the painted 2D window frames…?